Difference between revisions of "Darien"

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By Jade Locklen
 
By Jade Locklen
  
==Introduction==
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=Introduction=
 
Darien, demigod of Esmara, has long been known as the god of laughter, but is he more? Laughter is far more than a simple sound. Thus, this researcher seeks to establish the reach of Darien’s domain, and the variations of doctrine found within his following. Though many consider him a minor demigod, small sects of worshippers have been found. These sects normally claim a major god as their main deity, but have incorporated Darien into their worship. The younger gods and, interestingly, the nature gods are most commonly paired with the god of laughter.
 
Darien, demigod of Esmara, has long been known as the god of laughter, but is he more? Laughter is far more than a simple sound. Thus, this researcher seeks to establish the reach of Darien’s domain, and the variations of doctrine found within his following. Though many consider him a minor demigod, small sects of worshippers have been found. These sects normally claim a major god as their main deity, but have incorporated Darien into their worship. The younger gods and, interestingly, the nature gods are most commonly paired with the god of laughter.
  
==Merriment==
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=Merriment=
=Rural=
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==Rural==
 
For the majority of these sects, the most common incarnation of Darien portrays him as the god of merriment. Because laughter comes so often with good friends, food and drink, the demigod eventually became associated with such in more rural areas where close-knit communities were found. For this reason, if one looks closely in a backwoods tavern, one might see the god’s symbol somewhere inconspicuous in an effort to gain his blessing. Happy customers are returning customers, after all. Eventually performing bards might be seen to order a drink before a performance and set it to the side, remaining untouched throughout the night. This glass was for the god, an invitation for him to join in the fun.  
 
For the majority of these sects, the most common incarnation of Darien portrays him as the god of merriment. Because laughter comes so often with good friends, food and drink, the demigod eventually became associated with such in more rural areas where close-knit communities were found. For this reason, if one looks closely in a backwoods tavern, one might see the god’s symbol somewhere inconspicuous in an effort to gain his blessing. Happy customers are returning customers, after all. Eventually performing bards might be seen to order a drink before a performance and set it to the side, remaining untouched throughout the night. This glass was for the god, an invitation for him to join in the fun.  
  
=Urban=
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==Urban==
 
The association with merriment manifested somewhat differently in urban societies. Darien subtly appeared within the arts. In certain performances or during the creation of particular artistic pieces, one might call on the god to help inspire laughter and general merriment within observers. These same pieces might also become an offering to the god in thanks for his aid. However, most of the references to Darien within any urban setting were in a more general sense, the everyday usage applied to all the gods’ domains. Most worshippers of this aspect of Darien were found within the rural communities mentioned above.
 
The association with merriment manifested somewhat differently in urban societies. Darien subtly appeared within the arts. In certain performances or during the creation of particular artistic pieces, one might call on the god to help inspire laughter and general merriment within observers. These same pieces might also become an offering to the god in thanks for his aid. However, most of the references to Darien within any urban setting were in a more general sense, the everyday usage applied to all the gods’ domains. Most worshippers of this aspect of Darien were found within the rural communities mentioned above.
  
==Life After Death==
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=Life After Death=
 
Some cultures actually made Darien part of their death rights, secondary to Rakus. These communities believed the life of the departed should be remembered with joy and celebrated in full. Funerals were happy occasions, which demanded laughter and stories of those passed. If a community was particularly devoted to the person who died, it might invoke Rakus to honor death, Esmara to honor the person’s life and Darien to remind the community of the happy times.
 
Some cultures actually made Darien part of their death rights, secondary to Rakus. These communities believed the life of the departed should be remembered with joy and celebrated in full. Funerals were happy occasions, which demanded laughter and stories of those passed. If a community was particularly devoted to the person who died, it might invoke Rakus to honor death, Esmara to honor the person’s life and Darien to remind the community of the happy times.
  
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==Battle==
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=Battle=
=Philosophy=
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==Philosophy==
 
The next group is, perhaps, the oddest of the four. These followers worshipped Darien in relation to battle. “Go laughing into death,” the saying went, “for death is lighter than a feather.”  The philosophy of that statement seems to have differed from follower to follower. For some it was about finding joy in life, even in the midst of fighting a war. For others it was the love of battle itself, the rush that brings laughter to a fighting man’s lips. No matter the attitude, these followers believed Darien lightened their spirits and called on him often before and during a battle, usually after calling on their main deity.
 
The next group is, perhaps, the oddest of the four. These followers worshipped Darien in relation to battle. “Go laughing into death,” the saying went, “for death is lighter than a feather.”  The philosophy of that statement seems to have differed from follower to follower. For some it was about finding joy in life, even in the midst of fighting a war. For others it was the love of battle itself, the rush that brings laughter to a fighting man’s lips. No matter the attitude, these followers believed Darien lightened their spirits and called on him often before and during a battle, usually after calling on their main deity.
  

Revision as of 05:35, 2 September 2013